Breast Cancer Awareness
|
HesperiaStar.com
  • MOJAVE GARDENER

    Add a touch of Mediterranean to your High Desert garden

    • email print
  • As we all know, water is a valuable resource and anything we can do to conserve it is a good thing.
    Reducing lawn areas and using low-water use plants are a couple of ways to save water in the landscape. There are numerous ways to achieve a beautiful, water-conserving landscape — one of those is to create a Mediterranean-style garden.
    Mediterranean-type plants are adapted to cool winters and warm dry summers, and many thrive in the Southern California climate. Many are native to the Mediterranean region of Europe, while many others are from California, parts of Australia, Chile and Africa. Many of these species can even handle the extremes of the High Desert. All one really needs to do is place the plants in an area that has well-drained soil, plenty of light, and give them infrequent deep watering once they are established. The roots of these plants tend to rot if they are given too much water and not enough drainage.
    There are many species available in nurseries, garden centers and catalogs, just make sure that whatever you choose can handle our climate zones (USDA zone 8b or Sunset zones 10 and/or 11). This information should be on the plant's label or catalog description. If not, ask a knowledgeable sales person, or look it up in the “Sunset Western Garden Book.”
    The Mediterranean-type plants can offer a wide range of colors, textures and scents in both their foliage and flowers, creating fabulous appeal for the eyes and the nose. In addition, these plants can be annuals, perennials, herbs, groundcovers, shrubs and trees — a plant for every situation.
    Of course there are many plant species available that can achieve the desired results.
    Just look around or do a little research. Have fun creating your own Mediterranean-style retreat right in your own yard.
    High Desert resident Micki Brown is a drought-tolerant plant specialist with a master's degree in plant science.
    Send questions to be answered in the column to HorticultureHelp@aol.com.
    To see previous issues of the Mojave Gardener column, visit www.vvdailypress.com/ sections/mojave-gardener/
    " data-width="650" data-numposts="20" data-colorscheme="light">